⁨⁨Al-Tabl⁩ - ⁨الطبل⁩⁩

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⁨1⁩ Saturday, 1 September 1923
⁨2⁩ Sunday, 2 September 1923
⁨3⁩ Monday, 3 September 1923
⁨4⁩ Tuesday, 4 September 1923
⁨5⁩ Wednesday, 5 September 1923
⁨6⁩ Thursday, 6 September 1923
⁨7⁩ Friday, 7 September 1923
⁨1⁩ issue
⁨8⁩ Saturday, 8 September 1923
⁨9⁩ Sunday, 9 September 1923
⁨10⁩ Monday, 10 September 1923
⁨11⁩ Tuesday, 11 September 1923
⁨12⁩ Wednesday, 12 September 1923
⁨13⁩ Thursday, 13 September 1923
⁨14⁩ Friday, 14 September 1923
⁨1⁩ issue
⁨15⁩ Saturday, 15 September 1923
⁨16⁩ Sunday, 16 September 1923
⁨17⁩ Monday, 17 September 1923
⁨18⁩ Tuesday, 18 September 1923
⁨19⁩ Wednesday, 19 September 1923
⁨20⁩ Thursday, 20 September 1923
⁨1⁩ issue
⁨21⁩ Friday, 21 September 1923
⁨22⁩ Saturday, 22 September 1923
⁨23⁩ Sunday, 23 September 1923
⁨24⁩ Monday, 24 September 1923
⁨25⁩ Tuesday, 25 September 1923
⁨26⁩ Wednesday, 26 September 1923
⁨27⁩ Thursday, 27 September 1923
⁨28⁩ Friday, 28 September 1923
⁨29⁩ Saturday, 29 September 1923
⁨30⁩ Sunday, 30 September 1923

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About this newspaper

Title: ⁨⁨Al-Tabl⁩ - ⁨الطبل⁩⁩
Available online: 26 March 1921 - 19 December 1924 (113 issues; 589 pages)
Language: ⁨Arabic⁩
Region: ⁨The Middle East⁩
Country: ⁨Mandatory Palestine⁩
City: ⁨Damascus⁩ / ⁨Jerusalem⁩ / ⁨Haifa⁩
Collection: ⁨Jrayed - Arabic Newspaper Archive of Ottoman and Mandatory Palestine⁩
Frequency: ⁨Daily⁩
Description:
Al-Tabl (The Drum) was a “daily independent, social, critical, satirical Arabic newspaper” that was sometimes published only once a week. The paper included many pictures and illustrations and was of varying lengths. Sometimes the paper consisted of four pages, sometimes of two, and occasionally it made up a small booklet. The timing of its publication also varied according to the publishers’ whims. Al-Tabl always urged its readers to work for the common good. The newspaper’s slogan was “the truth is above all and cannot be overcome,” and it quoted it whenever discussing a topic that had a bearing on the nation and the homeland. According to the paper’s definition of itself, it spoke with the voice of the Arab people.
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